BanderasNews
Puerto Vallarta Weather Report
Welcome to Puerto Vallarta's liveliest website!
Contact UsSearch
Why Vallarta?Vallarta WeddingsRestaurantsWeatherPhoto GalleriesToday's EventsMaps
 NEWS/HOME
 EDITORIALS
 AT ISSUE
 OPINIONS
 ENVIRONMENTAL
 LETTERS
 WRITERS' RESOURCES
 ENTERTAINMENT
 VALLARTA LIVING
 PV REAL ESTATE
 TRAVEL / OUTDOORS
 HEALTH / BEAUTY
 SPORTS
 DAZED & CONFUSED
 PHOTOGRAPHY
 CLASSIFIEDS
 READERS CORNER
 BANDERAS NEWS TEAM
Sign up NOW!

Free Newsletter!
Puerto Vallarta News NetworkEditorials | July 2009 

The Return of the Dinosaur
email this pageprint this pageemail usThe News
go to original



The return of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) as the leading political force in the nation is baffling, to be mild about it.

Back in 2000, the PRI had ruled for 71 consecutive years in what philosophers called "the perfect dictatorship." It controlled the presidency, the governorships, both houses of Congress, state capitals and leading municipalities. It was a perfectly-oiled political machine.

Yet when the PRI first allowed a free election in 1997 under President Ernesto Zedillo, the power of the National Action and Democratic Revolution parties was felt through what is now detectable as voter backlash against a corrupt government. And the PRI was indeed corrupt.

After losing the presidency two consecutive times to the National Action Party, the last one in 2006, the party was taken over by the present leader, Beatriz Paredes, a woman who dresses in colorful Mexican costumes, and who has managed to bring squabbling inside the party to a virtual standstill.

Peredes opted for paying attention to the new cadre of politicians, who have given the party, not a facelift, but a revamped ideological structure, which is proving to be most acceptable to rural and small city voters.

The return of the "dinosaur," as the PRI is known, was very much in tandem with the disappointment over poor government policies under the National Action Party and the ludicrous internal squabbling of the Democratic Revolution Party. Both are paying a price, and though people are looking at smaller parties as a choice, the PRI's experience at organizing looks portentous, once again.



In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving
the included information for research and educational purposes m3 © 2009 BanderasNews ® all rights reserved carpe aestus