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Puerto Vallarta News NetworkEditorials | September 2009 

Question of Substance
email this pageprint this pageemail usObdulio Avila Mayo - The News
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September 09, 2009



The first three years of President Felipe Calderón's administration cannot be defined by one single event. Unlike in previous administrations where a single action or inaction defined the presidency, the Calderón government has faced several important challenges and has addressed them simultaneously in several directions, helping Mexico become competitive, strong, solid and ready for the future.

The recent financial crisis, whose magnitude is only matched by the crisis of 1929, seemed to be the only obstacle for our country to overcome in order for us to reach our goals of economic growth; and then the H1N1 epidemic was added into the equation. From there, the government had to take measures to address the serious decline in oil production, widespread drought and other situations that pushed the Calderón administration to its limits.

The message the President gave from the central courtyard of the National Palace did not express conformism, try to disguise the administrative work needed to be done or minimalize the obligation of citizen participation. Calderón made a concrete and honest call for the country to work together in order to transform Mexico and urgently respond to the legitimate priorities and aspirations of Mexicans. It is necessary to stop solely considering political calculations and strategies in order to make fundamental changes and reforms that would reduce the equality gap, he urged.

The agenda had 10 key points to push the country forward in terms of political, economic and social reforms. First on the list was the reduction of bureaucratic spending in order to focus the country's resources on efforts to curb the effects of poverty.

Fortunately, the presence of a wide variety of political actors was an additional message within the first. There seems to be a real will to resolve and transform the current reality of Mexico through fundamental changes. Now we just have to hope that these convictions don't blur with the rain of electoral contests or personal interest.



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