BanderasNews
Puerto Vallarta Weather Report
Welcome to Puerto Vallarta's liveliest website!
Contact UsSearch
Why Vallarta?Vallarta WeddingsRestaurantsWeatherPhoto GalleriesToday's EventsMaps
 NEWS/HOME
 AROUND THE BAY
 AROUND THE REPUBLIC
 AMERICAS & BEYOND
 BUSINESS NEWS
 TECHNOLOGY NEWS
 WEIRD NEWS
 EDITORIALS
 ENTERTAINMENT
 VALLARTA LIVING
 PV REAL ESTATE
 TRAVEL / OUTDOORS
 HEALTH / BEAUTY
 SPORTS
 DAZED & CONFUSED
 PHOTOGRAPHY
 READERS CORNER
 BANDERAS NEWS TEAM
Sign up NOW!

Free Newsletter!
Puerto Vallarta News NetworkNews Around the Republic of Mexico 

Mexico's Lower House Approves Medical Marijuana

May 2, 2017

"The ruling eliminates the prohibition and criminalization of acts related to the medicinal use of marijuana, and those relating to the production and distribution of the plant for these purposes."

Mexico City - Mexico's lower house overwhelmingly passed a bill on Friday approving the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes, the latest in a series of legal changes and court rulings that have somewhat relaxed cannabis laws in Mexico.

The bill was passed in December last year by the Mexican Senate, and on Friday was passed by the lower house by 371 votes to 7, with 11 abstentions. It will now be sent to President Peña Nieto's desk where it is expected to be signed.

"The ruling eliminates the prohibition and criminalization of acts related to the medicinal use of marijuana, and those relating to the production and distribution of the plant for these purposes," the lower house said in a statement.


Starting last year the Mexican government began granting permits letting some patients import medicinal marijuana products. It has also decriminalized small amounts of marijuana and issued several permits for people to cultivate and possess pot for personal use.

Those permits have only covered the specific individuals involved, however, rather than blanket laws applicable to all of Mexican society.

OK for science, medicine

The Bill would also authorize cultivation of marijuana plants for medical and scientific purposes and establish that industrial products with concentrations of 1 percent THC or less would be legal to buy, sell, import and export.

Rep. Rosa Alba Ramirez of the small Citizens' Movement party noted that, "this is not opening the door for a general and unchecked consumption because it includes measures so the health department can ensure it is not being abused or distorted to widen it to recreational use."

Rep. Arturo Alvarez of the Green Party said "this is a step in the right direction of exploring new alternatives of regulated, legalized and supervised use of marijuana, and can open up a new front for authorities to combat addictions and the violence that arises from the illicit activities of drug-growing, trafficking and consumption."

Marijuana for recreational purposes still remains illegal, and forcing full legalization is likely to be difficult in the politically and socially conservative Catholic country.

Sources: The HinduTelesur TV