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Season 2 of 'Fear the Walking Dead' Filmed in Mexico

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August 18, 2016

The dead roam the Earth when AMC's 'Fear the Walking Dead' resumes Season 2 on Sunday. (AMC)

Land, ho. Zombies? Oh, no.

After a half-season spent largely at sea, AMC's Fear the Walking Dead resumes Season 2 Sunday (9 ET/PT) on dry land, but in an increasingly shaky world.

Mexico, where the drama was filmed this season, offers a variety of intriguing geographic settings, from a Pacific Ocean resort to hot, rugged desert to the city of Tijuana, a reminder of the urban Los Angeles setting from the show's beginning.

After a three-month hiatus, the show will visit multiple environs in the season's final eight episodes, as the extended family of Madison Clark (Kim Dickens) and Travis Manawa (Cliff Curtis), connected by blood and circumstance, is separated for the first time.

"Mexico offered so much to us. There's so much beautiful tradition; there's the landscape; there's the ocean, the cities, the sprawling, vast desert areas," Ms. Dickens says. Now, the characters are "refugees in another country and that country offers all of its magic to the show."

The characters' arrival in Mexico, which happened in a recent episode, also offers Fear - the companion series to AMC's super-hit, The Walking Dead - a different feel, with a language barrier for some characters and new characters who see the flesh-eating zombies, or infected, as something other than monsters to be destroyed.

"In the States, there's a certain remove. There's more fear of death," executive producer Dave Erickson says. "In many other parts of the world, there is a sense that the dead are never really gone, that they're always present and that we should embrace them and not distance ourselves."

Read the full story on usatoday.com